SCROLL DOWN

Eye speed linked to impulsivity

18
Feb
2014

 

Eye Speed Linked to Impulsivity

Are you a fast and impulsive decision maker, or do you have more patience and are able to wait for rewards? This could be related to the speed that your eyes move! A new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience have discovered that people who are less patient have faster eye movements. Each eye movement is called a Saccade, a fast, simultaneous movement of both eyes in the same direction. They are in fact the fastest movement in the human body, occurring in milliseconds.

The research team measured the saccades using a camera that recorded the eyes moving from one dot to another on a computer screen. They found that the speed of eye movement differs significantly from person to person, but will remain consistent for each individual. Also there were differences between age groups, teenagers have the fastest eye movements, and they gradually get slower as you get older. In conjunction with this, the researchers also tested a person’s patience. Again the participants were asked to stare at the computer generated dots, this time the team lengthened the time between each dot moved position. This time they measured how long they looked at the dot, before losing patience and looking away. On comparison of the saccades and patience, the researchers found that the speed of the eye movements closely correlated to their level of patience. People who had faster eye movements were less willing to wait.

“Our hypothesis is that there may be a fundamental link between the way the nervous system evaluates time and reward in controlling movements and in making decisions. After all, the decision to move is motivated by the desire to improve one’s situation, which is a strong motivating factor in more complex decision making too”

Researchers believe that the findings could help to diagnose medical conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and substance abuse. Impulsivity can be used to diagnose and treat these and other conditions, and it is usually tested through the use of questionnaires. Measuring eye movements instead, could provide a more direct, and truthful assessment, and hopefully make diagnoses faster, more accurate and allow for more effective treatment.

 

By: Hannah Howard

If you are interested in vision correction at Focus Clinic please call us on 0207 307 8250 and book a free consultation.

Book your FREE consultation
Related Articles
Get in touch
Thank you for getting in touch with Focus. Your message is on its way and one of our friendly team will be in touch shortly!
Reviews

Roger

16th Jun

reviewsListing-roger

'I wanted the best and believe I got it'

close
close
big close

Book a free* consultation

There is a refundable admin fee of £25 for consultations during the week and £50 for consultations in the weekend. This will be returned to you when you attend the appointment.
Thank you for getting in touch with Focus. Your message is on its way and one of our friendly team will be in touch shortly!

Would you rather speak to someone?

*Opening Times:
Monday - Friday: 9am – 6pm Saturday: 9am – 3pm

Would you rather speak to someone?

Call: 0207 307 8250

to arrange your free* consultation
There is a refundable admin fee of £25 for consultations during the week and £50 for consultations in the weekend. This will be returned to you when you attend the appointment.
Mr Samer Hamada
laser and lens eye surgery specialist
 Samar Hamada